Paul M. Gross papers, 1939-1979

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Source Collection

This digital collection comprises selected materials from the following archival collection at Duke University Archives:

Paul M. Gross papers 1939-1979

Collection #UA.05.53.0001 | 60 Linear Feet

ABSTRACT
Contains the personal and professional records of Paul Magnus Gross, a Duke University administrator, researcher, educator, and scholar. Gross was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). The Paul M. Gross Chemistry Laboratory was named in his honor. Gross was also an independent consultant with the United States Army and various commercial companies. Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Major subjects include Duke University, the Graduate School, the Department of Chemistry, University Council, the Board of Trustees, University Research Council, Duke University administration, University Committee on Long-Range Planning, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, study and teaching of physical sciences, military training, war education, munitions development, United States Navy, United States Army, Office of Ordnance Research, universities in the southern United States, and the Gross-Edens controversy. Major correspondents include J. Deryl Hart, Robert Lee Flowers, Douglas M. Knight, Marcus Hobbs, Charles E. Jordan, and Arthur Hollis Edens. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. English.

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